GMO n (genetically modified organism) an organism whose genetic material has been altered to include DNA molecules from other sources. This DNA is then transferred into an organism, giving it modified genes. Also known as GM or GE.

Transgenic organisms are a subset of GMOs. These are organisms inserted with DNA from different species.

Includes animals, food crops, and other foodstuffs.

Currently, the US does not require that these items be labeled.

Organic adj of, relating to, or derived from living matter; food certification includes standards which include:

  • no use of fertilizer, pesticides, antibiotics, food additives, GMOs, irradiation, or the use of solid or semisolid organic material obtained from treated wastewater, often used as a fertilizer or soil amendment;
  • production on land that has been free from prohibited synthetic chemicals for a number of years;
  • detailed written production and sales records;
  • strict physical separation of organic products from non-certified products;
  • periodic on-site inspections.

In the US,

products made entirely with certified organic ingredients and methods can be labeled “100% organic”;

products with at least 95% organic ingredients can use the word “organic”;

products containing a minimum of 70% organic ingredients, can be labeled “made with organic ingredients”.

These regulations can and are stretched in varying circumstances.

Health and intellect are the two blessings of life. – Menander

Feminine woman, this is your lane.

Pay attention. Protect your health and that of your family.

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The greatest wealth is health. – Virgil

Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.  – World Health Organization, 1948

If you have health, you probably will be happy, and if you have health and happiness, you have all the wealth you need, even if it is not all you want.  – Elbert Hubbard

Meet Misty Copeland

Personally,

Perhaps I can create a feminine version of this

Or even better, this

🙂

A good hostess is

  1. Comfortable. She sets the mood for the party and so is light-hearted, relaxed, and sociable. Her space is open, welcoming, and festive. Food and drink are located in a way that encourage guests to move throughout the room(s). And there are adequate seating and surfaces to rest glasses and plates.
  2. Ready. She has double checked the details. Every space a guest may visit is spotless and supplied. Extra necessities are tucked neatly away in convenient locations. She is dressed and prepared to receive guests at least an hour early.
  3. Hospitable. Her guests are made to feel special. She greets everyone personally, points out where everything is located, and makes introductions. It is important that each guest is comfortable and engaged.
  4. A member of the party. She does a fine job of replenishing food, drink, etc. and tidying up. She also takes deep breaths, remembers that this is actually fun, and she thoroughly enjoys herself.

I’d best get some ideas!

In nature there are neither rewards nor punishments – there are consequences. – Robert G. Ingersoll

Baggage is ineffective at home.

Ignorance, infallibility, insecurity and their ilk are known losers.

Baggage does not travel well.

Taken into the realm of the unfamiliar, to the world stage . . . EPIC FAILURE.

Natural consequence.

To be expected.

Reality.

There are but two choices:

  1. Keep the baggage –> remain loyal to the familiar or take it on the road and become a spectacle for all the world to see.
  2. Lose the baggage –> exercise the freedom to venture out, experience the world and enjoy all of its bounty.

Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters. – Albert Einstein

Harmony makes small things grow, lack of it makes great things decay. – Sallust

Sometimes when I consider what tremendous consequences come from little things . . . I am tempted to think . . . there are no little things . . . – Bruce Barton

by Deola Sagoe